The Gatehouse Blog

Let’s talk about EX

There are few things as disruptive or costly as good people walking out of the door. Organisations wanting to hold on to their very best people must invest time and effort in strengthening and maintaining the employee experience. Matt Frost from Gallagher Communication shares five tips to create a great EX, or employee experience.

Whether you swipe right, read the personal ads, or stake out fancy bars and country clubs, the search for the perfect partner isn’t always an easy one. In an increasingly competitive jobs market, the same is true for employers seeking top talent too.

Finding the right match in the first place is important, but holding onto them for the long term is where the hard work really happens. The secret: great EX, or employee experience to use the full term. Following in the footsteps of employee satisfaction and engagement, EX covers everything an employee encounters, observes or feels over the course of their lifetime with an organisation.

Providing great EX at every level of the employee lifecycle will help attract and retain skilled employees, drive a strong customer experience and deliver positive business results.

Tip 1: Make a good first impression

First impressions count and a strong employer brand is crucial for attracting the right calibre of candidates. The best people want to work for the best organisations. Your employer brand needs to demonstrate your values, personality and culture right from the offset.

Tip 2: Embrace the honeymoon period

The honeymoon period, in any relationship, helps you decide whether to stay together or part ways. Onboarding is one of the most critical times for the employee employer relationship.

Employees need to understand how their job role fits into the company, why their individual position is valuable, and what they ‘get’ in return for their efforts and commitment.

“Providing great EX at every level of the employee lifecycle will help attract and retain skilled employees, drive a strong customer experience and deliver positive business results.”

Tip 3: Listen and learn

You don’t get away with not listening at home, and you won’t get away with it at work either! However you go about it, informal listening or formal research, insight gathering is one of the most valuable activities a business can undertake. Listening enables you to find out what makes your employees tick, and what turns them off.

Tip 4: Get your family onboard

Real life relationships are more likely to succeed with the support of family and friends. In the same way, the employee employer relationship is more likely to succeed if your managers are on board.They act as highly visible advocates and ambassadors for your employee brand, so if they don’t understand a change or internal message, the chances are your employees won’t either.

“Real life relationships are more likely to succeed with the support of family and friends. In the same way, the employee employer relationship is more likely to succeed if your managers are on board.”

Tip 5: Prove that you care

From hire through to retire, every interaction you have with your employees should be used as an opportunity to connect with them emotionally and intellectually. Communicate with passion, purpose and personality. Messages should be tailored to address the needs, interests and ambitions of your people (it’s not about you)! On top of that, find ways to use data, trends and behavioural insight to personalise the experience and help employees take control and make decisions that are right for them and their family.

Biography: Matt Frost

Matt is Business Development Director at Gallagher Communications. He has more than 15 years of experience working with organisations of all shapes, sizes and sectors. Matt’s passion for clear, honest and creative communication has helped some of world’s leading organisations successfully engage their employees at an emotional and intellectual level and, in recent years he has been heavily involved in a number of high profile cultural and change management programmes.