The Gatehouse Blog

Making Britvic Employees feel valued – Simplifying a complex reward system

Quite often in large companies, employees don’t know the total value of their employment package. Properly outlining and breaking it down can be a real driver of employee engagement. Harveen Gill, Reward Advisor at Britvic, explains how they created an individualised, engaging and easy to understand reward statement. 

The challenges

We offer employees a very strong overall reward package. However, as is often the case with large companies, we found that our employees didn’t always understand or appreciate all of the elements that make up the total reward package.

Up until last year, a letter was used to communicate concise information about employees’ pay change and bonus. The letter was very complex and word-heavy, and therefore not always fully understood. In the case of the reward statement, less was more – we didn’t need to overload it with information. It also needed to be more engaging to read and understand.

“We wanted to make our reward statements completely individual for people and more exciting to open, resulting in higher levels of engagement.”

Since 2014, we had tried to take a more visual approach, and found that this landed much better than previous ‘text-heavy’ versions. However, we wanted to inject much more creativity into these tired-looking statements, and align them to the new branding of Growth Performance Success (GPS), our performance management, reward and talent programme. Even more importantly, we wanted to make our reward statements completely individual for people and more exciting to open, resulting in higher levels of engagement.

A bespoke, high-impact brochure

We worked with Gatehouse, a specialist internal communication and employee engagement agency, to create something more visually stimulating than we’d done in years past.

Cover 1

The sheer amount of financial data and the complex nature of it meant that coming up with a simplified design to work for everyone was a huge challenge. Any design that was developed needed to be adaptable enough to work across different locations, with varying degrees of information on each.

“From the personal information, right through to the graphs and charts, everything was unique to the individual’s package.”

All of the individual components were illustrated in a simple, branded visual dashboard built for Britvic, and, as a result of using a sophisticated data merge functionality in Adobe InDesign, every statement was bespoke for each employee. From the personal information, right through to the graphs and charts, everything was unique to the individual’s package.

Simplifying complex information

The project involved presenting complicated data from various departments across 6 countries (India, Ireland, the Netherlands, Singapore, the UK and the USA), to approximately 2,000 employees. After digesting all requirements from Britvic, Gatehouse decided to adjust the design and amended it to 14 versions to reflect our needs.

Cover 2

inside 2

Gatehouse worked hard to find a design that would work for everyone. The inspiration behind the final creative execution was taken from a typical desktop environment, aimed at simulating the calculation process of the financial information. To address the nature of the business, adding soft drinks imagery created a familiarity that the audience could relate to. Plants and fruit were also added to reflect the company’s attitude towards healthy and balanced lifestyles. The chosen format was a tri-fold brochure, with an attractive cover giving it a tactile and luxurious finish.

Britvic was looking for something that really played to the strengths of the current brand and the work we’d done before on the GPS programme. The objective was to improve the design, look and feel to match our proposed graphic style, which was lively, colourful and more engaging.

The benefits

This approach made it considerably easier for us to manage. Last year, producing the booklets proved challenging because of the data I had to pull together myself, and we had to manage different designs for different countries. This year, the fact that we stuck to one design and engaged with the relevant teams using a simple data template made it much easier.

From an employee engagement perspective, the benefits have been significant. We’ve taken information that we want people to understand – and information that is critical for them to understand – and presented it in a simple, clear, high-gloss format, which is visually engaging and easy to decipher at a glance.

Many people have since made comments about how they instantly understood it: “Within the first five seconds, I understood exactly what my bonus and percentage was.”

Next steps

The reward statement is used as a tool to deliver, in some instances, a great message around business performance and it builds understanding around the subject. But perhaps more importantly, it is also used as a communication tool for when managers discuss performance with their employees. It sort of provides the script and the structure around the conversation to make the interactions more meaningful and valuable.

“It is also used as a communication tool for when managers discuss performance with their employees.”

I think that the next logical step for us would be to adopt a more digital approach. Whilst it’s great to have these high-impact statements delivered to home addresses, I think our ambition is very much to build on the interaction between employees and managers when discussing their rewards. We’re investigating how can we keep the same look and feel and interactivity but translate that into a digital platform, so that managers can interact with it prior to delivery to their team.

 

BIOGRAPHY – HARVEEN GILL

Harveen Gill has been Reward Advisor at Britvic plc for almost two years. She supports the development and delivery of the Pay, Bonus and Benefits strategy across all BUs and markets. After graduating with a first class degree in Business Management – HR Management, she started working at a luxury retail company in HR, and soon realised she wanted to specialise in reward.